Benefits

20/20/20 Benefits

An unmarried “20/20/20” former spouse qualifies for medical benefits and commissary and exchange privileges if all of the following requirements are met:

  • The parties have been married for at least 20 years (date of marriage to date of divorce decree or annulment);
  • The service member performed at least 20 years of service creditable for retirement pay; and
  • There is at least a 20 year overlap of marriage and the military service.

A former spouse who has employer-sponsored medical insurance is not eligible for military medical care or TRICARE. If the employer plan is optional, the former spouse may decline that insurance and remain eligible under TRICARE.

The former spouse may enroll in TRICARE Prime, where available, at the same rate as a retiree, with the accompanying enrollment fee and co-pays. If the former spouse uses TRICARE Standard, he or she is responsible for the co-pays and any amount over the TRICARE allowable charges. DEERS will reflect TRICARE eligibility for unmarried former spouses using the former spouse’s own Social Security number. For more information, access the TRICARE page for former spouses.

Marriage Divorce Graphic

20/20/15 Benefits

A “20/20/15” former spouse qualifies for medical benefits for one year from the date of the divorce or annulment if all of the following qualifications are met:

  • The parties have been married for at least 20 years (date of marriage to date of divorce decree or annulment);
  • The service member performed at least 20 years of service creditable for retirement pay; and
  • There is at least a 15 year overlap of the marriage and military service.

A “20/20/15” former spouse who has employer-sponsored medical insurance is NOT eligible for the one-year transitional medical care. However, if the employer plan is optional, the former spouse may decline that insurance and participate in the one-year benefit.

“20/20/15” spouses are not eligible for commissary, exchange, or MWR privileges. Children residing in the household of a separated spouse continue to be eligible for commissary privileges until the divorce is final.  Once the divorce is final, children residing in the home of a former spouse who are not authorized commissary privileges are not considered members of the authorized sponsor’s household for purposes of commissary privileges, even if the sponsor provides or maintains the household. Children continue to be entitled to use the exchange and MWR if they are dependent on the sponsor for over 50%of their support.

“20/20/15” spouses are not eligible for commissary, exchange, or MWR privileges. Children residing in the household of a separated spouse continue to be eligible for commissary privileges until the divorce is final. Once the divorce is final, children living with a former spouse are not considered members of the authorized sponsor’s household for commissary privileges, even if the authorized sponsor provides or maintains the former spouse’s home. Children are still entitled to use the exchange and MWR if they are dependent on the sponsor for over 50% of their support. 

ID Cards After Divorce for Eligible Spouses

If you are a 20/20/20 spouse or a 20/20/15 spouse, be prepared to bring specific documents with you to the pass and ID office at your nearest installation to get your new ID card. Bring certified copies of your divorce decree, marriage certificate, and the service member’s DD214 (if retired). You will also need the service member’s Social Security number. The former spouse will be issued a new ID card with a different identification number from the service member. It is always a smart idea to contact the ID office before you go to verify what documents you will need.

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